Feeling Jumpy?

There are two types of jumping.  There is good jumping as in I want my dog to jump over an obstacle in an agility run or dock-diving event, or to jump and climb a tree for a trick as I did here with my dog, Duffy; and there is the jumping that interferes and is unacceptable in the home and in public.  Interestingly, one can help the other. Making sure your dog has enough daily exercise through walking and free play is a great way to tone down the overly energetic dog, but then comes the important second act–training to NOT jump. And this includes training the HUMANS that allow it to happen and even encourage it in the first place.

Here are three great ways to get the jumping to stop. Remember patience is the key along with repetition in multiple environments both in and out of your home. I do not recommend the “knee to the chest method” since it not only can hurt your dog, but also does not help your dog understand he cannot jump on others.

1. Examine your behavior and those of your family members.  Is the dog being acknowledged and petted when his feet are on you when your are standing or sitting?  If so, stand up and walk away ignoring until the exact moment…wait for it…when your dog has four feet on the floor.  I mark the behavior with an enthusiastic “yes” and bend over to pet my dog.  But if the feet are up I fold my arms and ignore my dog until the feet are on the floor again.

2. The Advance and Retreat method is best illustrated by these young ladies in this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=csuMGROvvVU  There are many variations on this method of training including when you are alone…tethering your dog and then having you approach in a similar manner. At no time should the dog be on a choke or prong collar. I like the use of a flat buckled collar, martingale or harness. Another method is to give the dog a 30 second time out on the tether and then reuniting with them to show that jumping loses attention and inclusion.

3. Teaching your dog an alternative behavior. I love teaching dogs to “go to their mat” when guests arrive at the home.  It takes persistence, especially when linking this behavior to the sound of the doorbell but totally worth it.  Another approach used by many trainers is stepping on the leash with two feet and having the dog self correct.  Even Ian Dunbar has advocated taking a break mid-walk and teaching the dog to “settle” which is a terrific idea.  First we jazz the dog up and then we quickly ask for a DOWN.  In public places remember to use something of high value as a reward such as chicken or steak pieces.  Initially we start with this high value food and gradually wean them off. http://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/jazz-settle-down-–-sirius-adult-dog-training

Usually it is a combination of methods that gets the job done.  When training your dog it is handy to bring a log to class and take notes, then once training at home keep a record of your progress.  Dogs learn every moment they are with us, so we need to be aware of what we are saying to them through our interactions with them.

©2015 Dorice Stancher; All rights reserved.

Dorice Stancher, MBA, CPDT-KA has certified thousands of dogs for the AKC Canine Good Citizen and pet therapy wit the Bright and Beautiful Therapy Dogs.  She is an award-winning trainer and journalist, and a regular contributor to AKC Family Dog, AKC Gazette, and WebVet. 

Let’s Get Social…

Part of the fun of having a dog is getting out and having fun!

Part of the fun of having a dog is getting out and having fun!

In the next few articles we will provide tips on how to get your dog to be your best outdoor buddy. Often after a long winter dogs have trouble making the adjustment from couch potato to social butterfly. And leash walking can be a real pain for the owner’s shoulders with pulling, lunging and sometimes even downright frightening reactivity to sights and sounds. What is an owner to do? We will discuss equipment, training suggestions and ways to get your dog to be a pleasure to be around in public.

Today’s topic is walking and the types of collars and harnesses we recommend and use. Our go-to item for teaching nice walking is the Easy Walk harness and the Gentle Leader. These both require the proper fit so when sizing it helps to have your dog present. There is also a video on fit and use by the manufacturer on the Internet. The reason we like this equipment is that it makes it easier for the owner to communicate to their dogs by this gentle pressure method which will not harm the dog’s trachea. Besides these two owners of rescues and greyhounds have found the Martingale to be helpful as it prevents dogs from pulling their heads out of the collar and running free. Some chain models often serve as a warning that the collar is closing, but these are not meant to choke the dog. Other collars including the slip or choke and prong are not recommended by this trainer for pet owners as they should only be used with expert guidance and supervision because of their potential for harm.

Equally as important is working on getting your dog’s attention and teaching them to walk properly. We will discuss this in our next article. Don’t forget-JB Pet in Hawthorne, NJ, The Madison Dog Resort in Waldwick, NJ and Canines Can Do will help you and your dog get off to the right start with proper equipment and lessons. FMI visit http://www.caninescando.com for more information.

How sheepherding can help the urban dog…

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How sheepherding can help the urban dog...

Dorice Stancher (c)2014

They may seem cuddly and counting them may be great for sleeping, but make no mistake herding sheep is challenging and some of them are downright ornery!

I live in a condo without a fenced backyard so I look for out-of-the-box, left of center ways to train my dogs to be obedient good little canine citizens.  I recently took a lesson with Carolyn Wilki, owner of the Raspberry Ridge Sheep Farm in Bangor, PA, who has been herding since 1987 and studied at both Cornell and Bryn Mawr. If you are a fan of NY Times writer John Katz, you may recall that his highly successful “Dogs of Bedlam Farm” series mentions his experiences training with Carolyn and how he found not only a way to reach his dogs on another level but to also find a sense of inner peace http://www.bedlamfarm.com/?s=carolyn+wilki

And so here are a few of the things both my dogs and I learned.  It is not a crime to slow down and appreciate the world around you.  The bleating of the lambs is almost hypnotic. and for a North Jersey caffeinated girl this was a welcome respite after a tough week. As our emotions influence our dogs, it was better for them too.  “Control is an illusion,” remarked Carolyn as I attempted to call my alpha female Wheaten Terrier off of the three prancing sheep she was chasing.  Obviously I was not as fun as they were.  It was suggested I move my feet and catch her as she turned and remarkably when I asked her to “Lay Down” she hit the dirt, and then when I called her she came trotting back to me.  As a professional dog trainer I always advise my students when training in public to make themselves more interesting than the object of attraction.  While teaching a “Leave It” command is a nice idea, when something so fantastically tempting catches a dog’s eye, a backup plan and execution is even better.

There were so many temptations in the pen: sheep poop, sheep hair, sheep, smells of other animals in the distance like ducks and goats.  And little by little they were of secondary importance as Krista and I learned the dance of two, and becoming united in our purpose to drive those three ornery sheep in our chosen direction following Carolyn’s instructions. She is one of only two sheepherding instructors in the entire country that uses positive reinforcement I learned, and in attendance in my little class were people from California, Brooklyn and Long Island.

I don’t think our condo association allows sheep although my dogs do have a resemblance so I think our next attempt at herding will be with the Canadian Geese that frequent our local park, remembering the goal is to night frighten them into flight, but to keep them together, to have them march toward a pre-determined direction, respecting their personal space.  In my head is the perfect vision of our teacher and her Border Collie  driving the sheep effortlessly and zen-like across the field and into their pens with a “That’l Do” as the final note-a peaceful ending to a great day.

 

Adult Dog Training 101-Teaching Your Dog Not To Jump!

With adult dogs it is challenging to undo existing behaviors but it can be done with patience, persistence and re-training for the human and canine members of the family.  If training more than one dog tackle this challenge with one dog at a time for initial training.  Have your materials for training near the front door or where most of the greetings take place.  Here is what you’ll need-a jar of soft treats (I use a plastic air-tight container), a leash and either a clicker or your marker word. I use “YES”.  You will also need a willing accomplice.  When dealing with small dogs it is an easier matter to ignore and praise the not jumping, but with a lab this is another story!  Have your willing “guest” practice approaching the dog without coming in the door initially.  The handler should praise for four feet on the floor, click and treat.  If the dog comes up as approached the guest should fold their arms and retreat.  It is important to not severely correct at this point.  We are teaching self-control and the jerk and correction often excites the dog even more and results in more of an urge to lunge. Repeatedly have your friend approach and if the dog stands or sits MARK with the clicker or YES and work up to success.  (Remember in order for the CLICKER or YES to have meaning we need to introduce this to the dog firsthand. I usually say my dog’s name and then YES or CLICK when they look me in the eye).  ANother way to practice no jumping when alone is to secure your dog to an immovable object and then practice approaching in the same manner, praising for a sit or stand as approaching and turning away with not attention, arms folded if jumping occurs.  Try it!  This really works!

It’s National Train Your Dog Month!

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It's National Train Your Dog Month!

This may just look like a pretty pose but it took training to get that stand “just right”. Krista likes all eyes on her as a show dog but she also likes to learn new things like all dogs do. I have taught her to swim, pull me while cross country skiing, dance, swim and paddleboard and do about 50 tricks. Dogs really “can do” and so can yours!

Don’t Bite Me!

It might seem cute when your puppy chews on your fingers, until you feel those sharp little teeth!  Ouch!  It’s time to put an end to puppy play biting.  While it’s natural for your puppy to want to explore the world around him with his mouth, it’s just not acceptable in our homes.  

When nipped at most people pull their hands away.  Dogs see this as a game and it reinforces their urge to want to bite even more.  Shouting won’t make the behavior stop.  And hitting is out of the question.  So what to do?  You can say “Ouch” and walk away from the puppy.  We don’t want to reward the biting with attention.   You can also offer an acceptable chew toy in order to re-direct the behavior.  Another option is to put a deterrent on your hand and clothing (dog and child safe of course) so that the puppy realizes you aren’t very tasty.  Remember, everyone in your home must be consistent in order for training to be successful.  It also is a good idea to teach your dog that “everything has a price” so that he knows that all his “good stuff” comes from you.